Friday, July 17, 2009

Daily "Name This Person And Win!"

The first person who names the person in this picture wins a hug from Ben!!!

Rules
This is the second of two submitted by Erik Schullstrom. Thanks, again, Schully.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

Looks like a Cabbage Patch Kid

Anonymous said...

Hint... this person is mentioned in a Matthew McConaughey movie.

Anonymous said...

Hint...this person is thought to have come up with the idea of a blow up sex doll

Anonymous said...

Hint... Was responsible for keeping a particular style of moustache out of fashion for years to come...this person also hated Jews.

Anonymous said...

anyone?....anyone?...Bueller?

Anonymous said...

It's Hitler! Sweet. Another point for Schully.

Anonymous said...

One bright day in the middle of the night,
Two dead boys got up to fight.
Back to back they faced each other,
drew their swords and shot each other.
A deaf policeman heard the noise
and ran to save the two dead boys.
If you don't believe this lie is true,
ask the blind man, he saw it, too.

Anonymous said...

O! say can you see by the dawn's early light
What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
Whose broad stripes and bright stars through the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?
And the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.
O! say does that star-spangled banner yet wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep,
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
In full glory reflected now shines in the stream:
'Tis the star-spangled banner! Oh long may it wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
A home and a country should leave us no more!
Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution.
No refuge could save the hireling and slave
From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave:
And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave.

O! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
Between their loved home and the war's desolation!
Blest with victory and peace, may the heav'n rescued land
Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation.
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
And this be our motto: 'In God is our trust.'
And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

Anonymous said...

It has long been my personal belief that the egg salad sandwich is a sandwich too ugly to look at, let alone eat. I'm talking about those structure-less mayo bombs served on soggy white bread. An egg salad sandwich fitting this description shows up at my house roughly once a week wrapped in tight-fitting plastic - pretty much whenever Wayne hits up the neighborhood sandwich shop. I always look at him incredulously and ask...really? You really want to eat that? I just don't get it. Generally speaking he doesn't even like eggs very much. Whoever cast the egg salad sandwich spell on him did a fine job.

It wasn't until last week when we went to the Vivienne Westwood exhibit at the de Young museum that I was forced to rethink my position. At the café my friend Quyen submitted her sandwich order (one egg salad please)....I looked at her and shook my head. You too? This in turn opened up a lengthy lunchtime conversation on the merit of egg salad. Egg Salad Sandwich Lovers:2, Haters: 1.

My case wasn't helped by what was about to come out of the café kitchen. When her sandwich appeared before us the clouds parted, angels sang, and a golden beam of sunlight was cast onto her plate. It was an egg salad sandwich of a totally different breed. You could see vibrant yellow yolks, flecks of herbs, and capers. Mayo? Little if any. And the best part? Not a soggy piece of bread in sight.

And this is how inspiration strikes. I saw Quyen's tasty looking egg salad sandwich and it showed me that a sandwich made of hard-boiled eggs can be appetizing to both the eye and the taste buds. I thought about it for a few days and came up with a game plan for my own that went something like this. For the bread - whole grain bread toasted and sliced on the thin side. Toasting will help deter the sog-factor. Some crunchy add-ins were going to be critical to counter the mush factor of the eggs. My choice? Chopped celery. Eggs pair beautifully with herbs - at the market I was on the lookout for fresh dill, but came across chives instead. Perfect. I knew I was after a drier egg salad mixture and would use a minimal amount of mayo - just enough to bind the egg mixture together. Achieving bright yellow yolks would be of the utmost importance. A friend of my sister's recommended chopped bacon as an addition. I countered with fried shallots, but didn't end up using them at the last minute - the flavor was overpowering the eggs and chives. If you wanted to go that route, a remix of this sandwich where you broil some thinly sliced gruyere cheese onto your toast, top with the egg salad mixture, sprinkle with the fried shallots, and serve open-faced would likely be delicious.

It also dawned on me that this is prime egg salad sandwich season! Put all those leftover hard-boiled eggs from Easter to good use (I should note that we always had leftover hardboiled eggs that we didn't use in the hunt).

Before I sign off, I'd like to thank everyone for the overwhelmingly enthusiastic response to the Unwilling Cook's letter earlier this week. 180+ fantastic, thoughtful responses - and they are STILL coming in! It makes me very proud to have such an amazing community of readers, and I promise to keep you posted on his progress.

Anonymous said...

Jules's Bible passage

Jules ritually recites what he describes as a biblical passage, Ezekiel 25:17, before he executes someone. We hear the passage three times—in the introductory sequence in which Jules and Vincent reclaim Marsellus's briefcase from the doomed Brett; that same recitation a second time, at the beginning of "The Bonnie Situation", which overlaps the end of the earlier sequence; and in the epilogue at the diner. The first version of the passage is as follows:
“ The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the iniquities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men. Blessed is he who in the name of charity and goodwill shepherds the weak through the valley of darkness, for he is truly his brother's keeper and the finder of lost children. And I will strike down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to poison and destroy my brothers. And you will know my name is the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon thee. ”

The second version, from the diner scene, is identical except for the final line: "And you will know I am the Lord when I lay my vengeance upon you."
Jules delivers the famous pronouncement before killing Brett.

"And I will strike down..."
Play sound
Conclusion of the "Ezekiel 25:17" monologue and Brett's murder
Problems listening to this file? See media help.

While the final two sentences of Jules's speech are similar to the actual cited passage, the first two are fabricated from various biblical phrases.[176] The text of Ezekiel 25 preceding verse 17 indicates that God's wrath is retribution for the hostility of the Philistines. In the King James version from which Jules's speech is adapted, Ezekiel 25:17 reads in its entirety, "And I will execute great vengeance upon them with furious rebukes; and they shall know that I am the LORD, when I shall lay my vengeance upon them."[177] Tarantino's primary inspiration for the speech was the work of Japanese martial arts star Sonny Chiba. Its text derives from an almost identical creed used in either or both the Chiba movies Bodigaado Kiba (Bodyguard Kiba or The Bodyguard; 1973) and Karate Kiba (The Bodyguard; 1976).[178] In the 1980s television series Kage no Gundan (Shadow Warriors), Chiba's character would lecture the villain-of-the-week about how the world must be rid of evil before killing him.[179] A killer delivers a similar biblical rant in Modesty Blaise, the hardback but pulp-style novel Vincent is shown with in two scenes.

Anonymous said...

Hitler...baby Hitler...little sweet tiny baby Hitler